Latest report from the Small Arms Survey

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Latest report from the Small Arms Survey

Postby GOSA » Fri, 2007-09-21 07:56

http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/08/ ... l-Arms.php

A few quotations and then the story:

> Other countries with high per capita ownership include Yemen, with 61
> small arms per 100 people; Finland, 56; Switzerland, 46; and Iraq, 39.
> Much lower on the scale are Brazil, with 9 guns per 100 people;
> England and Wales, 6; India, 4; China, 3; and Nigeria, 1.
>
> "There's a large number of states in the middle, mostly northern
> industrial states in Western Europe and North America," said Krause,
> citing France, with 32 per 100 people; Canada and Sweden, 31 each; and
> Germany, 30.
>
> The figures dispel the idea that gun ownership and high levels of
> violence necessarily go hand in hand, he said.
>
> "There's no clear relationship between more guns and higher levels of
> violence," Krause said, pointing to low ownership and high crime rates
> in Latin America.



Story:




Global study says civilians now holding 650 million small arms


The Associated Press
Published: August 28, 2007




GENEVA: Civilians now have access to 650 million small arms — from
handguns to semiautomatic rifles — an arsenal that far outstrips that
held by police forces and the militaries worldwide, according to a
report released Tuesday.


The annual Small Arms Survey estimates that civilians account for about
three quarters of the 875 million such weapons in circulation today.


The United States is the worldwide leader, with up to 290 million guns
in circulation, or nearly one per person, according to the survey.


"Civilian holdings of weapons worldwide are much larger than we
previously believed," the director of the Geneva-based group, Keith
Krause, told reporters.


The report notes that only about 12 percent of all weapons worldwide are
registered with authorities, making it difficult to collect exact data
on gun possession. Five years ago, the group estimated a total of 640
million small arms worldwide. The new figure was the result of more
systematic reporting by countries and arms researchers, Krause said.


Other countries with high per capita ownership include Yemen, with 61
small arms per 100 people; Finland, 56; Switzerland, 46; and Iraq, 39.
Much lower on the scale are Brazil, with 9 guns per 100 people; England
and Wales, 6; India, 4; China, 3; and Nigeria, 1.


"There's a large number of states in the middle, mostly northern
industrial states in Western Europe and North America," said Krause,
citing France, with 32 per 100 people; Canada and Sweden, 31 each; and
Germany, 30.


The figures dispel the idea that gun ownership and high levels of
violence necessarily go hand in hand, he said.


"There's no clear relationship between more guns and higher levels of
violence," Krause said, pointing to low ownership and high crime rates
in Latin America.


He said studies had shown that gun violence often occurred in places
undergoing rapid urban growth, and when lawless areas are created by
extreme poverty and the absence of effective policing.


The problem is worsened when members of government or police forces sell
ammunition onto the black market, said Krause.


In the Brazilian city of Rio de Janeiro, "a combination of factors
suggest that state security forces — most notably the police — are the
source of much of the assault rifle ammunition in the hands of criminal
gangs," the report said.


It also claimed Ugandan security forces were supplying ammunition to
Karimojong tribal groups engaged in inter-clan fighting in the north of
the country, undermining attempts to end the conflict and disarm the
groups.


Better controls on the sale of weapons to countries with lax safety
measures or questionable human rights records are needed to prevent
small arms ending up in the hands of criminals, militants and terrorist
groups, the 360-page report said.


Thousands of arms supplied to Iraq by the United States are believed to
have been acquired by insurgents through rogue elements in the Iraqi
security forces.


Sudan, meanwhile, has purchased more than 25 million firearms — mostly
from China and Iran — in recent years despite well-documented human
rights violations committed by government-backed militias.


Krause said wealthy countries with lower crime rates, such as those in
the 27-nation European Union, are dealing with an increased flow of
small arms over international borders where controls have been loosened.


Recent shootings in Britain — where ownership is severely restricted and
the gun crime rate is low — highlight the need for greater police
cooperation in Europe, he said.


"The guns are being effectively smuggled in, and that's extremely hard
to control as border controls diminish," he said.
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GOSA
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